Leading Special Education Expert Pete Wright to Empower Parents and Professionals at Napa Conference

Famous Dyslexic, Pete Wright, is coming to California! Don’t miss this Supreme Court Winning Attorney and U.S. Leading Expert on Special Education Law on May 19, 2017 in Yountville, CA.

Pre-registration is Required.

Registration closes Friday, April 28th.

EVENT DETAILS
The Wrightslaw Special Education Law & Advocacy Conference will be held at the Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater on Friday, May 19, 2017. Conference hours are 9 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. The cost to attend is $190 for individuals and $235 for professionals. An early bird rate of $165 or $210, respectively, is available until April 21, 2017.

Pre-registration by April 28 is required. An optional boxed lunch will be offered for $15. Each attendee will receive three of Peter Wright’s books, valued at $62.85. Professional attendees will qualify for CLE and/or CEU credit. Register online at http://www.lincolntheater.com.

The conference agenda covers a variety of special education and advocacy topics, including: special needs assessments and evaluations; determining progress vs. regression; age equivalencies; individualized education plans (IEPs); strategies for parents advocating for their special needs child, including developing a long-term game plan and coping with conflict and crisis; and much more. It will answer such questions as:

  • What rights do parents have in a child’s education?
  • Can the school do that?
  • How do I get more Speech, OT services?
  • What can I do for a child who’s fallen behind in Reading / Math?
  • Can the school say they don’t have the money to provide accommodations or resources?
  • Should the school pay for outside evaluations?
  • What is the school required by law to provide a child?
  • Can the school suspend my child for “behavior problems”?
  • How is my child really doing in school?
  • Does a child qualify for mainstreaming or inclusion (and what’s the difference)?
  • Can the school say a child needs medication?

 

You Asked! Question 6

Download a PDF version of this You Asked question and answer here.

Q6:  How is ADHD different from Dyslexia? I am concerned that my student has dyslexia but am being told by the school psychologist that it is just “inattention” issues that are preventing my student from being able to read at grade-level?

A:  According to the International Dyslexia Association, Dyslexia is a language-based learning disability characterized by difficulties with accurate and fluent word recognition, spelling and reading decoding. People with dyslexia have problems discriminating sounds within a word or phonemes, a key factor in their reading and spelling difficulties.

Dyslexic children and children with ADHD have some similar characteristics. Dyslexic children, like children with ADHD, may have difficulty paying attention because reading is so demanding that it causes them to fatigue easily, limiting the ability to sustain concentration. People with dyslexia and those with ADHD both have difficulty with reading. The dyslexic person’s reading is typically dysfluent, with major problems with accuracy, misreading both large and small words. The person with ADHD may also be a dysfluent reader, but his or her reading is not characterized by misreading words. The ADHD reader may skip over punctuation, leave off endings, and lose his or her place. The disfluency of both the ADHD person and the dyslexic reader may negatively impact comprehension. Both may avoid reading and derive little pleasure from it. Both the person with dyslexia and the person with ADHD typically have trouble with writing. The typical dyslexic writer has significant problems with spelling, grammar, proofreading, and organization. The ADHD writer often has difficulty with organization and proofreading. Both the dyslexic writer and the ADHD writer may have handwriting difficulties.

Individuals with dyslexia and ADHD may be underachieving in school even though they are often bright and motivated. The goal for them, as it is for all children, is to meet their potential. It is critical that children with these disorders be carefully evaluated because treatment for one disorder is different from the other. Inaccurate diagnosis can lead to inappropriate intervention and a delay in timely, effective intervention (Source: The International Dyslexia Association).

To download the complete Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD) and Dyslexia Fact Sheet by the International Dyslexia Association click HERE.

 

For more YOU ASKED questions and answers click HERE